Promiscuous Neighbors and Occasional Formula Feeding for 05/05/2018

Promiscuous Neighbors and Occasional Formula Feeding for 05/05/2018
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My next-door neighbor is a single mom who works long hours. Her 13- and 15-year-old daughters are often alone. They are good kids. But I see random boys coming and going a lot, and I’m worried the girls are making bad choices. I’d like to tell the mom she needs to work less so she doesn’t leave them alone as much. How can I say this gently? — Concerned Neighbor

Dear Neighbor: I have to assume this mom is working long hours because she has no other choice. She might not be getting child support from the children’s father. She may have medical bills or extensive debt that must be paid. It doesn’t really matter. The point is that Mom is working her tail off and raising two girls on her own.

Updated: Sat May 05, 2018


Promiscuous Neighbors and Occasional Formula Feeding for 05/05/2018

Sexy Songs and a Son's Diary for 04/28/2018

Sexy Songs and a Son’s Diary for 04/28/2018
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My 8-year-old kid loves Katy Perry songs, which are seemingly all about sex. However, we’ve been innocently singing along in the car and having a blast. Well, that is until recently, when I heard her singing about a menage a trois in public. My husband and I were mortified. Do I have to put an end to this, and if so, how? — Katy Fan’s Mom

Dear Mom: On a scale of inappropriate, your daughter belting out potentially racy lyrics rates about a four on a 10-point scale. Sure, it would likely make some older folks uncomfortable to hear your little lady squealing sexual innuendos and sex talk. But that’s more about them than your daughter. She doesn’t know what she is saying.

Updated: Sat Apr 28, 2018


Sexy Songs and a Son’s Diary for 04/28/2018

A Sunday Sleepover and Conflicting Stories for 04/21/2018

A Sunday Sleepover and Conflicting Stories for 04/21/2018
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My 14-year-old daughter was invited to a birthday pool party at a local resort. It’s being held on a Sunday night. The girls are expected to sleep over and miss school on Monday. I told my daughter she could attend the party but I would be picking her up at 10:30 p.m. Of course, she threw a fit. Am I being unreasonable? — Party Pooper

Dear Pooper: First things first, who throws a sleepover party for ninth-graders on a school night? Sleepovers are some of my best childhood memories — up all night, all the chatter with the lights off, the late-night snacks, the secrets. It’s a special time. And I don’t necessarily disagree with kids missing school here and there for fun events. Life is short. But missing school to attend a birthday party doesn’t quite meet the bar.

Updated: Sat Apr 21, 2018


A Sunday Sleepover and Conflicting Stories for 04/21/2018

Fearing ADHD Meds and a Hair Catastrophe for 04/14/2018

Fearing ADHD Meds and a Hair Catastrophe for 04/14/2018
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My daughter has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. She showed the signs for several years. However, recently, she has had much more trouble in school, and even with her friends. Her doctor recommended she try medication to help control some of her behavior, but we are really against it. There are side effects, and we don’t want her to be dependent on drugs for the rest of her life. What do you think about it? — Concerned Parents

Dear Concerned: What if your daughter didn’t have ADHD but instead was born with a congenital heart condition that required her to be on medication for the rest of her life? Would you consider withholding the drugs? I highly doubt it. Yet when it comes to mental health conditions, people often consider medical management a non-necessity. While there are other treatments, studies show that medication, especially when combined with other therapies, is highly effective in treating ADHD.

Updated: Sat Apr 14, 2018


Fearing ADHD Meds and a Hair Catastrophe for 04/14/2018

Visible Tattoos and a Sugary Breakfast Habit for 04/07/2018

Visible Tattoos and a Sugary Breakfast Habit for 04/07/2018
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My son will be 18 in a few months. He has been accepted into college and will be moving to a big city in the fall. He says that once at college, he’s going to get a tattoo on his hand or wrist. I don’t mind a tattoo, but I’m concerned about him losing job possibilities because of his tattoo being too visible. But he will be 18, and the only thing I could do is threaten to take away his college money. Would that be a mistake, or is this decision too big to allow a young man to make? — Purse Strings

Dear Strings: I am never a fan of using the purse strings to keep young adults in line. If your son is wasting your money, blowing off classes and failing semester after semester, then it’s time to pull the plug, or at least change the deal. Otherwise it’s time to let your son grow up and make his own decisions.

Updated: Sat Apr 07, 2018


Visible Tattoos and a Sugary Breakfast Habit for 04/07/2018