The Best Drone for Kids, Ever!

My son, Emmett, absolutely loves anything remote controlled. He loved little RC cars, and now he loves drones. Over the years we have been through many. That’s because most of them last a few days to weeks. Inevitably, the propellers twist or there’s a mysterious controller disconnection or the frames break from impact. It’s always frustrating and disappointing, especially because drones don’t come cheap.

I visited a toy show a few months ago and discovered the best line of drones for kids I have ever seen. I was excited to get one home and have Emmett test it out. The nice ladies representing the drones told me it was extremely hearty, built to last. I was skeptical but hopeful.

Well, the drones completely live up to the hype. I’ll let Emmett do the reviewing. But from a parent’s perspective, I’d buy this drone for every kid on my list. It’s fun, has the coolest design and can withstand more than its fair share of crashes. Emmett reviews the Drone Force Angler Attack and Vulture Strike below. For me the clear winner is the Angler. It’s nearly twice the price but it’s uniqueness makes it worth the price. If it’s out of the budget, Emmett loves the Vulture Strike, maybe more than the Angler.

Drone Force Angler Attack-2.4Ghz Illuminated Indoor/Outdoor Drone Helicopter Toy
http://amzn.to/2yrV9h8
$72 on Amazon, 8+

Emmett’s Review:
This drone looks amazing, like a crazy real angler fish. Probably the best looking drone I’ve ever seen. The drone has very good control, and if it was my first drone it would be easy to learn to fly. It’s not super challenging. There are lights all over the drone and are easy to put on and off. They are really cool. The battery charges quickly and lasts for a long time. It’s very stable when it’s flying and super durable. The propellers aren’t going to hit anything. They are well protected. When it flies at night it’s so fun. It looks like a scary angler fish when it lights up. The controller has big and easy to use buttons.

Overall recommendation: If you are looking for a drone I would definitely get the Angler Attack Drone.

Drone Force Vulture Strike-2.4Ghz Indoor/Outdoor Drone Helicopter Toy with Missile Launcher Feature
http://amzn.to/2yQtyul
$37 on Amazon, 8+

Emmett’s Review:
The Vulture Strike is a little faster than the Angler Attack drone. It looks like a bird which is cool. It can do tricks like flips. This drone is also very protected and can be flown inside and outdoors. The Vulture Strike has a target light that is projected so you know where to aim. It can shoot two plastic missiles (It comes with four in case you lose any). The missiles don’t go very far but they are extremely fun to shoot. The controls and the stability is similar to the Angler Attack. It’s very stable and easy to control. It’s slightly harder to fly than the Angler Attack. I would probably recommend this drone for a kid who has flown a drone before. The flight range is 150 feet, just like the Angler Attack.

Overall Recommendation: For someone who has already flown a drown I would absolutely recommend this drone.

 

Disclosure: These products was provided for free. However, these reviews are our own and reflect our true feelings on these products. Some links may be affiliates. 

No Present Christmas and a Bogus Girlfriend for 12/16/2017

No Present Christmas and a Bogus Girlfriend for 12/16/2017
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My 14-year-old son has told me to get him nothing for Christmas. He says he doesn’t need or want anything. Meanwhile, his brothers have long lists. Money isn’t an issue, yet I’m struggling with not getting him something. I don’t want him to miss getting presents, but it seems weird to force presents on a kid who doesn’t care for them. What should I do? — Spent

Dear Spent: There are several reasons your son might say he doesn’t want anything this year. I’d consider the reasons carefully so you know how to proceed.

Updated: Sat Dec 16, 2017


No Present Christmas and a Bogus Girlfriend for 12/16/2017

Santa Surveillance and Checking Bedtime at College for 12/09/2017

Santa Surveillance and Checking Bedtime at College for 12/09/2017
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My kids’ behavior has been dreadful lately. I’ve tried everything, and I feel like I can’t make a dent. The kids love Christmas and Santa, so I’m thinking about getting The Elf on the Shelf to encourage good behavior. Even though I’ve totally resisted because I have no time for this, I’m hoping the behavior will at least improve for December. Should I get it? — Hesitant

Dear Hesitant: Every year I hear parents say to their misbehaving kids, “Santa’s watching.” And every year I’m heartbroken for those parents. They are out of tools. They believe the only way to improve behavior at this point is to hold the loss of material gifts over their kids’ heads. Now there are even more options for pretending someone all-knowing is watching your kids. First there was the elf who reports back to Santa to decide who’s been naughty and who’s been nice. Then the Mensch on a Bench showed up so the Jews don’t feel left out. Now there are even Santa spy surveillance cameras (Can you say creepy?) that light up when Santa’s elves are observing. Good grief!

Updated: Sat Dec 09, 2017


Santa Surveillance and Checking Bedtime at College for 12/09/2017

Sabotaging College and Emotional Meltdowns for 12/02/2017

Sabotaging College and Emotional Meltdowns for 12/02/2017
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My son is a senior, and he is slowly throwing away all of his options for college. He has excellent SAT scores, but his grades are erratic. He isn’t going to class and is missing a lot of assignments. When confronted, he is remorseful but still can’t get his act together. He’s sabotaging himself, and I’m heartbroken watching him fail. I’ve tried everything to help him to no avail. What can I do now to stop his downfall? — Devastated

Dear Devastated: It’s painful to watch an accident happening and not be able to prevent it. As a last-ditch effort, it might help to organize a big conference with your son, his high school counselor and his teachers to allow everyone to work on the issues together. Try not to add additional stress and pressure, as that may actually make your son regress further. Instead, focus on addressing his emotional needs, and let the school help with the academic ones.

Updated: Sat Dec 02, 2017


Sabotaging College and Emotional Meltdowns for 12/02/2017

A Homebody and a Christmas Tree for 11/25/2017

A Homebody and a Christmas Tree for 11/25/2017
Dear Family Coach

Dear Family Coach: My son is strongly considering a college close to us so he can live at home. It’s not a financial decision, as we have set aside enough money for dorms. My wife and I love our son, but we feel it would be best for him to experience college away from us. We are his crutch. How wrong or hurtful would it be to forbid him from living at home? — Nearly Empty Nesters

Dear Nesters: You are your son’s crutch for a reason. For 18 years, you probably allowed him to settle in comfortably in your home without pushing him to his limits. When he balked about attending a birthday party, you probably let him to skip it. When he didn’t want to attend sleep-away camp, you probably happily kept him at home. That’s fine. But now, you can’t expect him to be ready and prepared to fly the coop. You want to pull the crutch away from him without building up a safety net. That’s not fair.

Updated: Sat Nov 25, 2017


A Homebody and a Christmas Tree for 11/25/2017